Bayside Gazette 10031 Old Ocean City Blvd.
Berlin, MD 21811
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Editorial

Editorial - Articles


Golf member drop not unique to Ocean Pines

Posted On: 12/17/15
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The golf club membership problem in Ocean Pines is every club’s problem in recent years, as the sport nationwide struggles to return to its pre-recession level of popularity. Of course, the Pines club’s problems began well before the economy bottomed out, as the quality of the play it offered nearly sank out of sight before a massive overhaul returned it to the level it enjoys today. But enjoyment is the key issue here, in that golf isn’t the attraction it used to be, especially among the younger generations who are vital to the sports’ future. A Washington Post story last March examined the state of the golf industry and found that despite its claim that things have been looking up, it’s still playing in the rough in terms of appeal to new players. In short, the game hasn’t changed, the population has. As the Post wrote, “The game – with its drivers, clubs, shoes and tee times – is expensive both to prepare for and to play...
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Pines golf meeting a start

Posted On: 12/10/15
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The one consistent thread apparent in the notes of the recent meeting with representatives of the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors and golf course operator Landscapes Unlimited was the need for a clearer line of communication between the association and Landscapes. As is generally the case with most initial meetings, concerns seem to outnumber bright spots in the conversation. However, the advent of a more open discussion is a step in the right direction. What wasn’t entirely clear is whether the cause of these concerns – tee time management, building repairs, food service and a continuing decline in membership – is because of inertia on Landscape’s part or confusion over who’s responsible for resolving issues, the association or course management. One of the main worries for property owners has been the lack of solid information from the association on why the course continues on a downward spiral. While open and honest dialogue tends to bri...
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High-profile trial offers one more reason to be thankful

Posted On: 12/3/15
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Post-Thanksgiving reflections on the good things in life probably didn’t include this reason to be glad you live in this area: at the start of Monday’s jury selection process for the Freddie Gray trial in Baltimore, the 75 people called as prospective jurors were asked if they ever had been the victim of a crime or ever had been charged with one. Thirty-eight people – that’s one person more than half of these randomly selected people – stood up to say “yes,” that they were either victims, perpetrators or alleged perpetrators at some point in their lives. As astonishing as that is, an even greater number of people stood up on the second day of the proceedings to declare the same thing. Again, these are people whose names were, metaphorically speaking, pulled from a hat. Even though this hardly qualifies as scientific survey – and it’s possible that more than a few people lied to avoid jury duty for this volatile case – it st...
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Life isn’t always a beach, but we do all live on one

Posted On: 11/26/15
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Not to be preachy, but isn’t this the time of year that we should be thankful that we’re here and functioning rather than being self-involved, angry and uncivil because, well, this is America and it’s our right to be anyway we want? One might argue that we’re simply following the tone set by the increasingly divisive bleating of current and recent national political campaigns, as candidates encourage our fierce dislike – and worse – of anyone who doesn’t see things our way. But it’s the other way around – they are reflecting and playing to the self-centered disagreeableness that we have, for one reason or another, been cultivating for years. More succinctly, not only does it seem that we become more rude, belligerent and disrespectful every year, but we also appear to celebrate it. Driving a little slow in the left lane because you’re approaching your turnoff? If you’re lucky, all you will get from the outraged driver...
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Time for Berlin, fire company to move on

Posted On: 11/19/15
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While, as Yogi Berra once observed, it’s not over until it’s over, the three-year battle between the Berlin Fire Company and the Town of Berlin has reached a détente and appears to be on its way toward closure. While that, of course, is a good thing, it’s even more important to Berlin’s residents, who are dependent on both for their health, welfare and safety. It would be counterproductive at this point to revisit the various circumstances of the episode or to argue about who was right or wrong in a mess that divided the community. Further, there is nothing to be gained by either the town or the company dragging this history behind them as they enter into future discussions. What the community needs is two entities that can address the needs and requirements of each other without being adversarial about it or being inflexible without good reason. Some pride will have to be dispensed within the months ahead because the fire company needs local governme...
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Ocean Pines needs to find middle ground

Posted On: 11/5/15
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To expand or not to expand facilities in Ocean Pines to serve the public beyond the needs of the community is one of the key questions the homeowners association’s long-term plan and its town meetings needs to address. Problem is, a simple yes or no answer won’t suffice. While there will be both detractors and proponents for almost every individual item ultimately listed in the plan, the community needs to sharpen its focus on what its real objective should be: to provide facilities adequate for association members only or to continue on the path of providing services scaled to serve the greater area. In recent years, certain projects have generated considerable controversy because their scopes were such that they had to draw on public support from outside the association to make financial sense. Further complicating the equation is that IRS rules dictate that the public, not just association members, must be allowed to join income-producing programs so that any pr...
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Berlin’s agenda all about moving ahead

Posted On: 10/29/15
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Some critics, wherever they are, might say that the Town of Berlin is doing too much too quickly, what with it poised to approve a significant increase in housing on the edge of town and the conversion of the former Tyson Foods property into a major recreation facility. Add to that its consideration of a solar power project and an apparent deal to place a Dollar General project on a parcel to be shared eventually with a new police station and a community center. Supporters, however, would contend that the town is building on the momentum set in motion several years back by activist business people and a core of local officials who recognize that the pursuit of economic growth can only occur when circumstances permit it. It’s all about the town’s increasing desirability as a place to live, a phenomenon that most Eastern Shore towns – barring those near the bay bridge that have become spiritless commuter colonies – have not experienced in years. Understanding ...
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Health Literacy on rise in county schools

Posted On: 10/29/15
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Based on recent findings by University of Maryland’s Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy (UM), there was a statistically significant increase in health literacy among students in Worcester County Public Schools who took part in the Integrated Health Literacy Program (IHLP) during the 2014-2015 school year. The student’s overall health literacy – or the ability to obtain, process and understand basic information – improved. In January of 2015, Atlantic General Hospital (AGH), Worcester County Public Schools (WCPS) and UM introduced students in grades two countywide – and in third, fourth, and fifth grade pilot classrooms – to the IHLP lessons. Students were pre-tested on their baseline knowledge of health literacy related concepts. After the implementation of IHLP lessons into their science, social studies, reading language arts and math classes, students were then post-tested on the topics covered during those lessons and measurement...
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Town, BFC should settle

Posted On: 10/15/15
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Although the sorry tale of the Berlin Fire Company, Zack Tyndall and the Town of Berlin has long since vanished from the headlines, it now appears to be a case closed forever. With a settlement reached in Tyndall’s harassment suit against the company and others, that aspect of this unfortunate situation has been concluded, but some unfinished business remains. The fallout from the case also drew in the Town of Berlin, which at one point more or less severed financial ties with the company. To be sure, there were multiple reasons for the break and in some instances it came down to a contest of wills. As is frequently the result of confrontations between two parties such as these, the public becomes caught in the middle. Right or wrong has nothing to do with it. The relationship between the town and the company has thawed somewhat over time, but it has yet to fully recover, as the friction between the two remains. With the end of the dispute between Tyndall and the company, ho...
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Development needs limit

Posted On: 10/1/15
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Few, if any, people would want to block the Rinnier Development Company’s 700-plus-townhome complex on Seahawk Road, as it would help maintain the economic balance and vitality that is necessary to Berlin’s success. As Mayor Gee Williams observed this week, the town does not want to become so exclusive that only the upper middle class and beyond can live there. That can happen, as has been demonstrated in other highly desirable towns on the Eastern Shore, as well as in Ocean City, where the cost of housing is one reason – there are others, of course – for its dwindling residential base in recent years. Obviously, increasing exclusivity leads to increasing expense to a community’s remaining residents. Still, amending the zoning code to permit the Planning Commission to decide how much is too much, as it pertains to the number of units per building in a housing development, is asking for trouble. Common sense says that what Rinnier proposes to do is pro...
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