Bayside Gazette 10031 Old Ocean City Blvd.
Berlin, MD 21811
Phone: 410-641-0039
Fax: 410-641-0085

Editorial

Editorial - Articles


Traffic could jam future

Posted On: 2/11/16
Written By:

Palmer Gillis, of Gillis Gilkerson, the builder and developer of the Delmarva Health Pavilion in Ocean Pines, has a point. Although he refrained from saying it bluntly when he met with residents last Friday to discuss his project’s traffic flow problems, that facility is there to stay, like it or not. That won’t be the end of it either, as more will happen on that parcel over time, whether his company does it or it’s some future owner who figures out a way to get a better return on the investment. How the pavilion got there, whether Gillis Gilkerson should have purchased the property in the first place and what anyone said or didn’t say two or three years ago going into the project is irrelevant. That’s history and the issue now is how to address the future in a way that’s at least tolerable for everyone involved. There’s no reason to doubt Gillis when he said if the project’s ingress and egress issues can’t be resolved, he would...
» Click here for the full story.

Bargain of assessments

Posted On: 2/4/16
Written By:

The release this week of the Ocean Pines Association reserve study, coupled with comments made by General Manager Bob Thompson at his town hall meeting Saturdy, should provide residents with plenty to think about — and argue over — should they be so inclined. The reserve study, conducted by Design Management Associates Inc. of Richmond, Virginia, concluded the OPA has about 25 percent of what it needs to maintain its common properties over the course of a 30-year period. Among other things, that assumption is based on the desire to build enough of a cushion to avoid hitting association members with a dramatic increase in their assessments should something serious occur that needs immediate attention. Naturally, there is strong disagreement about whether keeping reserve funds that total a little more than a year’s worth of revenues is the right thing to do, but the fact remains that property owners could do it if they so desired. As Thompson pointed out Saturday, p...
» Click here for the full story.

Case of motion sickness

Posted On: 1/28/16
Written By:

Although the matter was discussed Thursday and whatever resolution might have resulted occurred after this publication went to press, the philosophy behind the proposal to form a committee to study the Ocean Pines Association’s management situation by itself deserves some discussion. The short question, obviously, is why the OPA Board of Directors needs a committee to do what it is capable of doing itself? As it is, governments, including homeowners associations, occasionally create committees or employ independent consulting firms to produce studies to justify politically what they want to do anyway. We’re not saying that what this approach is about, nor are we saying that the work of all such groups is pointless — the OPA Budget Committee, for instance, performs a valuable service – but there are situations when the purpose of an ad hoc entity is to seek answers to questions that members of a governing body don’t to explore publicly. In this particul...
» Click here for the full story.

Ask your own questions

Posted On: 1/21/16
Written By:

Even though writing about budgets is part of reporting, there’s no way to present a story with sufficient detail to give the public anything more than a general idea of how a proposed financial package is going to work. Or not work, as the case may be. Even on the local level — never mind the monsters state governments create or the labyrinthine federal budgets that routinely thwart even the purest of scholars (presidential candidates have no chance at all) — a substantial spending-and-revenue plan involves more entries than can be explored and explained in the amount of time and space allotted. The problem is not so much the numbers themselves, but understanding why they are what they are. Even the people who produce or adjust these numbers don’t have all the answers, as their entries are often variations of figures established by their predecessors. This is why, as the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors and its budget committee work on the community...
» Click here for the full story.

Registration open for Komen Race

Posted On: 1/21/16
Written By:

Registration is open for the Susan G. Komen Maryland Ocean City Race for the Cure, which features a competitive and recreational 5K run/walk and 1-mile family fun course, Saturday, April 16 on the Boardwalk beginning at the inlet.   Through Friday, Jan. 22, Komen Maryland is offering a $15 early bird discount on all adult registration types, making an adult untimed registration $20 and an adult timed registration $25. This year’s call to action is #OneStepCloser. “Each year there are new discoveries that bring us one step closer to finding the cures for breast cancer,” said Kim Marzullo, senior event manager. “Participant fundraising helps fuel those discoveries.” Komen Maryland has made some changes to the race this year, including the new Saturday race date. “With events planned across the weekend, this inspiring event will offer an opportunity to enjoy a weekend getaway to Ocean City as the sunny spring season begins,” said Jes...
» Click here for the full story.

Bravo to Berlin’s bold approach to its future

Posted On: 1/14/16
Written By:

Congratulations to the Town of Berlin, again, for continuing to go after opportunities that should bear fruit over the next few years, rather than focusing exclusively on projects and needs that deliver an immediate return. While there’s no such thing as a risk-free deal, the town’s pending purchase of the former Tyson chicken processing plant sets the stage for improvement no matter how the project turns out a decade from now. As Mayor Gee Williams observed this week, the plant has been sitting vacant and more or less unattended for years, offering nothing to the town except a spoiled view. At least under town ownership, the property can be made to look better now and possibly overwhelmingly good at some point down the road. Time, patience and a willingness to invest in a vision has become something of a tradition in Berlin, going back to the day when local investors resurrected the Atlantic Hotel. Although local government has followed that path for years, most notab...
» Click here for the full story.

Bravo to Berlin’s bold approach to its future

Posted On: 1/14/16
Written By:

Congratulations to the Town of Berlin, again, for continuing to go after opportunities that should bear fruit over the next few years, rather than focusing exclusively on projects and needs that deliver an immediate return. While there’s no such thing as a risk-free deal, the town’s pending purchase of the former Tyson chicken processing plant sets the stage for improvement no matter how the project turns out a decade from now. As Mayor Gee Williams observed this week, the plant has been sitting vacant and more or less unattended for years, offering nothing to the town except a spoiled view. At least under town ownership, the property can be made to look better now and possibly overwhelmingly good at some point down the road. Time, patience and a willingness to invest in a vision has become something of a tradition in Berlin, going back to the day when local investors resurrected the Atlantic Hotel. Although local government has followed that path for years, most notab...
» Click here for the full story.

Manklin Meadows reports should not cause concern

Posted On: 1/7/16
Written By:

There’s no point in jumping to conclusions, which would seem to be the case with reports that the Manklin Meadows project has gone over budget. It hasn’t gone over budget for one simple reason: no work has been done, outside of the creation of a site plan for an overhaul of the complex, so not much money has been spent. More simply put, something can’t be over budget until a budget has been set and that hasn’t been the case. All that has happened is that the Ocean Pines Association Board of Directors got an estimate of the cost from one bidder and that estimate apparently falls far short of what will likely be needed to add pickleball courts, more parking and other features. Further, the operative word in the previous paragraph is “likely” rather than “will,” because the overall undertaking continues to be evaluated. As General Manager Bob Thompson pointed out, it’s more probable that the single bid did not account for every as...
» Click here for the full story.

All things considered, good year ahead in ‘16

Posted On: 12/30/15
Written By:

Any number of predictions might be made and myriad past issues explored as we enter the new year and consider what lies ahead, as well as what went right or wrong in 2015. That, however, would be a pointless exercise. In the grand scheme of things, our accomplishments outweighed our difficulties, which were insignificant as compared to those experienced elsewhere. We did not, in the coastal area, suffer any calamities or face any great struggles. By and large, we went about our business, did the best we could, disagreed or concurred, and continued to proceed in a relatively peaceful fashion. If we’re guilty of anything, it would be getting caught up in the moment and attaching too much importance to matters that would hardly alter the course of our existence. On the flip side, our communities continued the area’s long tradition of unparalleled generosity, donating hundreds of thousands of dollars to charity and community improvement efforts. In addition, most of our bu...
» Click here for the full story.

Golf member drop not unique to Ocean Pines

Posted On: 12/17/15
Written By:

The golf club membership problem in Ocean Pines is every club’s problem in recent years, as the sport nationwide struggles to return to its pre-recession level of popularity. Of course, the Pines club’s problems began well before the economy bottomed out, as the quality of the play it offered nearly sank out of sight before a massive overhaul returned it to the level it enjoys today. But enjoyment is the key issue here, in that golf isn’t the attraction it used to be, especially among the younger generations who are vital to the sports’ future. A Washington Post story last March examined the state of the golf industry and found that despite its claim that things have been looking up, it’s still playing in the rough in terms of appeal to new players. In short, the game hasn’t changed, the population has. As the Post wrote, “The game – with its drivers, clubs, shoes and tee times – is expensive both to prepare for and to play...
» Click here for the full story.
Older Posts