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Cuisine

Cuisine - Articles


‘T-Wrecks,’ lobster, both look good on roll

Posted On: 4/7/16
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

‘T-Wrecks,’ lobster, both look good on roll A ragtag group of us parents are mentors for Titanium Wrecks, the NASA robotics team for Worcester County. You may know that our kids have been incredibly successful in our three-year history. And now, as a result of doing well again at two district events, our students will be in College Park starting today for district championships. These kids just keep pushing, and while a third trip to the world championships in St. Louis is not in the bag, I can see it happening for one reason alone; we’re broke. On top of being up to my eyeballs in robots and their accompanying financial strain, my spring semester is always heavy. Ergo, it’s not unusual for me to run on about four hours of sleep and copious amounts of coffee and water. Truth be told, this is the time of year that I look forward to teaching my night classes because they give me nonrobotics things to worry about, and these two in particular are near and dear to my heart: foods of the Americas, and French cuisine. I u...
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‘Comfort food to end all comfort foods’

Posted On: 3/31/16
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

‘Comfort food to end all comfort foods’ Newton saw the events of our everyday world as being strange and novel. He didn’t simply look at an apple falling to the ground as an incident unremarkable. He observed that there was something drawing the apple to the earth, much in the same way that we are held to our chairs as we type, or pressed into our Chuck Taylors as we tweet while we walk down a busy sidewalk. Truly these are enigmatic times in which we live, and one can scant envision what Newton would think were he to travel in time and witness the manners in which we live our lives. Cell phones, tablets, you name it: we are in a drastically different era of discovery. While I would in no way compare the study of food to the study of physics – although you can’t have the latter without the former – I do sit on my couch on occasion and wonder what it was like 300 or so years ago. And then I ponder the nonsense that we chefs play around with these days: molecular gastronomy such as spherification, foa...
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Just say yes to life, bacon mac ‘n cheese

Posted On: 3/24/16
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Just say yes to life, bacon mac ‘n cheese Between work, travel, logistics and the excitement of extra-curricular competitions, it’s more than my old bones can bear. I can still work a 15-hour day, but it definitely takes its toll on me and my spirit, as evidenced by the difficulty with which I wake up this morning. My aching bones, rusty joints and creaking back remind me that I am no longer a spring chicken. In fact, I have not been a spring chicken for a very, very long time. As I constantly try to convince myself that I still am as I once was, tokens pop up that instill in me the need to slow down a tad and to walk a little slower. Mayhap that is the joy of growing up; working smarter and not harder, or becoming more productive in the work day. When I was studying modern management techniques for my MBA, I was pleased to learn that servant leadership is a term that is used readily and proudly. In this style of management, we come to understand that our employees are more important than are we in the business model. ...
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Best-laid plans often don’t go as planned

Posted On: 3/10/16
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Best-laid plans often don’t go as planned I love it when a plan comes together, and sometimes it’s even enjoyable when the plan does not in fact go – well – as planned. In the words of the early chef Antonin Careme, “The recipe that I am going to sketch for you here is quick and simple: my life has not gone quite as planned.” Profound words from a man who would pass at the relatively young age of 48; but he would part ways with mother earth as a man who would change the landscape of Western cooking forever. In his few years on this earth, Careme managed to cook for kings, queens and czars, all while being able to codify an antiquated and disorganized system of professional and guild cooking. And to think that he did it all without once falling on his own sword. While my short tale is certainly not as dramatic or intriguing as Careme’s, it does go to show you that the best laid schemes of mice and men go often askew, or so sayeth Careme’s Scottish ...
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Blackened salmon with mushroom risotto

Posted On: 2/25/16
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Blackened salmon with mushroom risotto Reprinted from Bayside Gazette Feb. 25, 2015 issue Sometimes I feel like I just need to slow down a bit. With all the extracurricular activities with the kids, work, writing, snapping pictures and trying to keep the house straight, I don’t get much sleep. Now that the season is creeping up on us, I’m also looking for summer employment or maybe even considering a summer business venture of my own. My mind is like a constantly spinning hamster wheel: sometimes there’s an idea running rampant on it while, more often than not, the wheel spins empty It’s a vacuum in which not much intellectual stimulation is happening. But, I’ve come to accept that. When life gets in the way, we tend to migrate to prepackaged foods, fast food garbage or any of the myriad convenience products that we could get our mitts on.  But, the kids were the ones who say, “Enough, Dad.  We need some fresh food.” That’s all that I needed to hear, so I set out...
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Pot stickers only limited by imagination

Posted On: 2/18/16
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Pot stickers only limited by imagination As I sit here looking at the maddening schedule that comprises my spring semester, I realize just how much I look forward to summertime. The flurry of student activities, classes, extracurricular events and networking events leaves no time to slow down; no rest for the weary, as it were … Or at least unless it snows, or more to the point, “snow-rains” or “snains,” as it has a number of times recently. Expecting to go into work a couple hours late on Monday, I was surprised to learn that the college was closed, so losing no time we donned our snow bibs, gloves and hats in order to have one more snowball fight. Who knows? Maybe that will be the last one of the year. Regardless, we were happy to imbibe in the snowy slaughter before the rain set in. We were fortunate enough to build yet another snowman taller than my two younger kids before it was rapidly reduced to one big ice ball on Monday. I know we have been fortunate for the past few years with real s...
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Grass-fed hamburger, served ‘super-rad’

Posted On: 2/11/16
Written By: By Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Grass-fed hamburger, served ‘super-rad’ In sharing a few drinks in Milwaukee this weekend among family and new friends, a bike messenger from Chicago (a friend of my cousin) summed it up the best when he lifted up his pint and said “adulting sucks.” This was verily the sentiment in the room as we were celebrating the life of my cousin Taj, a soul gone way too young. Taj was gregarious, spontaneous and exuberant in his love for glam rock, a lifestyle that he lived from the 80’s until the very end. With his pink hair, broad smile and bear hugs, there was just something about the guy that you couldn’t help but to love. He never pretended to be anything that he wasn’t, but as we all know, we don’t get to pick and choose when our loved ones move on, and this was certainly no exception. At the wake, the priest gave his opening remarks and then my cousin Debbie read a passage. After that, people came to the podium to speak their mind, and that is indeed when the party began. I can honestly say...
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‘Immerse’ yourself in new way of cooking

Posted On: 2/4/16
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

‘Immerse’ yourself in new way of cooking One of the great joys of being a professor in culinary arts lies in inviting guest speakers; it’s important to get students in front of other people in the industry in the hopes that they branch out when they head into their journey. This week we were honored to host Daniel Liberson of Virginia’s Lindera Farms, and local vinegar hobbyist Chef Chett Bland (he’s the brains behind setting up the workshop in the first place). A young company that now services the likes of Daniel Boulud, Thomas Keller and Jose Andres, Lindera is the brainchild of the quintessential cook-turned-farmer-turned- producer Daniel [Liberson] and is housed at the farm in Northern Virginia. And his vinegars are good; damn good. In his presentation, Liberson talked about what it takes to forage for ingredients, namely the safety aspects thereof, and the basics on how to make your own vinegars. There were no recipes, but he encouraged students to go out and explore the possibilities of the ubiquit...
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Sour notes, for lemon tarts, are good things

Posted On: 1/21/16
Written By: By Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Sour notes, for lemon tarts, are good things Good old English curd. As tart and sharp as British wit, and as subtle and demure as a lonely seaside village. There is something mystical about a good curd that I was not privy to until a mere five years ago. Quite frankly, I never gave a rat’s tail end about the stuff, and I lay blame on ill-prepared lemon meringue pies that I had to suffer through in my childhood. To be clear, I now adore lemon meringue pies, as long as two conditions are met. One, the curd filling must be tart. The meringue will be sweet enough to counter the tartness, and nothing makes a lemon meringue pie fall flat on its face faster than “meh” on “meh.” When the contrasting of the uber-sweet meringue takes the edge off of the tart curd, I’m a happy man. Two, please oh please cook your meringue (Italian meringue). Nothing ruins a meringue pie more for me than an aftertaste that just reeks of raw egg whites. I can’t stand it. OK, the rant is over. And I’m not eve...
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In ‘world gone mad,’ food can be comfort

Posted On: 1/14/16
Written By: By Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

In ‘world gone mad,’ food can be comfort Lemmy and David Bowie are dead, the market is crashing, OPEC is holding secret meetings, Iran has detained 10 of our sailors, and watching the news is akin to watching the psycho-thriller movies of the ’80s. Do you remember those flicks; the ones that we always thought we’d never live to see? I guess we were wrong, but then reminiscing the way we dressed and wore our hair in the ‘80s, we were wrong about a lot of things. What in the world is going on? Is this the “new normal?” In a world-gone-mad, it’s nice to know that we can look around us and see the good if we choose to do so. I see it every day in the faces of my cats (even the “Evil One”), the swagger of my aging dog, the triumphs of my children and the strength of my wife. I can be in the worst mood, which is only exacerbated by any of the news stations out their – take your choice, they’re all pretty much the same – but I turn around pretty quickly when I see ...
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