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Cuisine

Cuisine - Articles


‘Immerse’ yourself in new way of cooking

Posted On: 2/4/16
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

‘Immerse’ yourself in new way of cooking One of the great joys of being a professor in culinary arts lies in inviting guest speakers; it’s important to get students in front of other people in the industry in the hopes that they branch out when they head into their journey. This week we were honored to host Daniel Liberson of Virginia’s Lindera Farms, and local vinegar hobbyist Chef Chett Bland (he’s the brains behind setting up the workshop in the first place). A young company that now services the likes of Daniel Boulud, Thomas Keller and Jose Andres, Lindera is the brainchild of the quintessential cook-turned-farmer-turned- producer Daniel [Liberson] and is housed at the farm in Northern Virginia. And his vinegars are good; damn good. In his presentation, Liberson talked about what it takes to forage for ingredients, namely the safety aspects thereof, and the basics on how to make your own vinegars. There were no recipes, but he encouraged students to go out and explore the possibilities of the ubiquit...
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Sour notes, for lemon tarts, are good things

Posted On: 1/21/16
Written By: By Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Sour notes, for lemon tarts, are good things Good old English curd. As tart and sharp as British wit, and as subtle and demure as a lonely seaside village. There is something mystical about a good curd that I was not privy to until a mere five years ago. Quite frankly, I never gave a rat’s tail end about the stuff, and I lay blame on ill-prepared lemon meringue pies that I had to suffer through in my childhood. To be clear, I now adore lemon meringue pies, as long as two conditions are met. One, the curd filling must be tart. The meringue will be sweet enough to counter the tartness, and nothing makes a lemon meringue pie fall flat on its face faster than “meh” on “meh.” When the contrasting of the uber-sweet meringue takes the edge off of the tart curd, I’m a happy man. Two, please oh please cook your meringue (Italian meringue). Nothing ruins a meringue pie more for me than an aftertaste that just reeks of raw egg whites. I can’t stand it. OK, the rant is over. And I’m not eve...
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In ‘world gone mad,’ food can be comfort

Posted On: 1/14/16
Written By: By Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

In ‘world gone mad,’ food can be comfort Lemmy and David Bowie are dead, the market is crashing, OPEC is holding secret meetings, Iran has detained 10 of our sailors, and watching the news is akin to watching the psycho-thriller movies of the ’80s. Do you remember those flicks; the ones that we always thought we’d never live to see? I guess we were wrong, but then reminiscing the way we dressed and wore our hair in the ‘80s, we were wrong about a lot of things. What in the world is going on? Is this the “new normal?” In a world-gone-mad, it’s nice to know that we can look around us and see the good if we choose to do so. I see it every day in the faces of my cats (even the “Evil One”), the swagger of my aging dog, the triumphs of my children and the strength of my wife. I can be in the worst mood, which is only exacerbated by any of the news stations out their – take your choice, they’re all pretty much the same – but I turn around pretty quickly when I see ...
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Et tu Brute? Try this recipe for Caesar salad

Posted On: 1/7/16
Written By: By Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Et tu Brute? Try this recipe for Caesar salad Caesar salad. Wow. Where to begin? It was November, 1984. It wasn’t long after I earned my license and started working my first job in Annapolis, the Chart House. But it was the first time that I had experienced one of the truest food-loves of my life; the salad eponymous with the man stabbed on the Ides of March by Brutus himself. The school year was dragging on, despite the fact that we had only been in session for a mere three months. You see, I hated school – with a passion. I was not a good student until I spent some time in the Marine Corps and realized that there just might be something else out there … or maybe it was the constant prodding and nagging of my well-meaning late mother, but I digress. My brother Danny and I had been afforded the opportunity to join our parents in Florida at the Barefoot Mailman, an interesting oceanfront inn that looked as though it was going to provide shelter for the week. But Mother Nature had different plans. Danny and I s...
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Bone marrow crucial part of serious BBQ

Posted On: 12/30/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Bone marrow crucial part of serious BBQ A couple of years ago I spent almost a week in Kansas City, where I lived in a perpetual state of the “meat sweats.” Between Oklahoma Joe’s BBQ, Anton’s Taproom & Steakhouse and Town-Topic burgers (where they cook the fries and burgers in lard), we spent enough time in meat joints to find ourselves on a perpetual quest for better meat than the day before. At Anton’s, I was lucky enough to have bone marrow for the first time in years. After braised pork belly and two-inch thick rib eyes the night before, an order of bone marrow at the bar with a glass of Prosecco was in order. There is something so special about roasted marrow bones, and admittedly, there are always a few stares as the bones arise from the kitchen and are sat in front of you. And so it was as my wife and I ate at Char, the yacht club’s monthly steakhouse concept spearheaded by Chef Tim Ulrich, a friend of mine with whom I have eaten my fair share of steaks. When Tim was the exec...
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Pork: your New Year’s Day picker-upper

Posted On: 12/23/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Pork: your New Year’s Day picker-upper Reprinted from Dec. 26, 2013 Time marches on and the present is no different from any other in terms of paltry temporal matters.   We are once again fortunate enough to be ringing in a new year and in a couple days someone out there will have a monstrous hangover as a result of their personal neglect.   No amount of Alka Seltzer or hair of the dog will quell the headaches, the shaky legs and grumbling stomach; it is up to the cook - the culinary alchemist - to settle the illness on day one of the year to come.   Of course, the easiest way to avoid a hangover is to not drink at all, but I quit the Temperance Union decades ago, hence I don’t even own my soapbox anymore.  They recalled it. Suffice it to say that today’s dish will make do for anyone who likes pork, but as luck would have it, this traditional Pennsylvania Dutch New Year’s supper also happens to be a great picker-upper for the partygoer, and it works great if you decide to have an e...
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‘Snow time like present to steam shrimp

Posted On: 12/17/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

‘Snow time like present to steam shrimp Really? The middle of December and I’m wearing shorts and flip-flops? I could get used to this, but I certainly know that it isn’t going to last. The cold weather will move back in, and I will have to retreat back into my jeans and sweatshirts, but boy this sure feels fantastic. I was speaking to a NASA engineer, who was telling us that NASA and NOAA research showed that there is more moisture in the upper atmosphere than ever recorded, and they expect that it will all come down this winter. What they don’t know is whether it will be rain or snow. Of course, you know that I’m voting for the latter, being the snow freak that I am. I can’t tell you how many times over the past four years I’ve looked out the third floor windows of Fulton Owen Hall at Wor-Wic during a night class, impatiently waiting for the first flurries to fall. There is just something so magical about it, and as I don’t mind driving in the snow at night, it makes for a fun jo...
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Nothing horrific about smoked bluefish

Posted On: 12/10/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CCEC PCIII

Nothing horrific about smoked bluefish There’s nothing quite like watching the babysitter getting killed by a dead 4-year old while you’re trying to write a scintillating article about smoked seafood. Yes, that is exactly what is happening at midnight as I try to compose a most-enticing piece of culinary literature that would encourage you to actually stop what you’re doing and smoke some bluefish. I can’t always help where and when I write these things, and as Mike (an employee at the old Solstice store in Berlin) wrote years ago, my tirades are the result of “giving a chef with ADD a typewriter.” Guilty as charged, and I thank you for the kind words, Michael. Amongst a twisted season of me actually enjoying Hallmark Christmas movies (more on that later), I came home last night to nothing less than “Young Frankenstein,” the Mel Brooks classic that slays me every time that I see it. To top it off, our 14-year old daughter caught the first half with me and she got it. She act...
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‘Perfectionist’ garlic puree perfects chicken

Posted On: 11/19/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Years ago I was reading Chelminski’s “The Perfectionist: Life and Death in Haute Cuisine,” the tragic rise and fall of real-life chef Bernard Loiseau (a contemporary of Paul Bocuse who took his own life when rumors circulated that he was about to lose a Michelin star). I was bemused throughout the story, as I knew the ending all too well; Loiseau was a hero in the nouveau cuisine movement. How could he do this? Trudging through the book, the reader experiences the highs and lows of haute cuisine and the dangers affiliated with such staunch reliance on a rating system. Though I haven’t seen the movie Burnt yet, I have been told, and I have read, that it fairly portrays life in the higher end of the culinary arts. But for now, I’ll just stick to the other end of the spectrum; what I call ‘food truck’ cuisine. Make no mistake. There is nothing worse for the wear in this genre of cooking. In fact this is the food that I like to make and eat on a ...
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When it comes to KC barbecue, trust Pokey

Posted On: 11/5/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

When it comes to KC barbecue, trust Pokey It’s hard for me to even remember what I’ve written about and what has eluded the clicking of keys under-hand. I feel that I have so much to say, but that so very much of it is uninteresting. I know my stories drive my kids insane, and I often get the courtesy laugh paired with deep sigh from my amazing wife, much in the same way that my Aunt Naomi shrugs and rolls her eyes when Uncle Tom gets on a roll of puns. I guess it’s in the blood and I have learned not to fight it too terribly much. After all, as we get older, we start feeling the finality of life around us and it thus becomes our responsibility to keep our family memories alive, generation after generation. For one, my nickname as a child was Pokey; a gift from my father still used by some of my siblings at holiday-time. I much prefer Pokey to Pablo and Pauly, so feel free to use it if you like. Another memory that brings great joy to me is travel. In our childhood, we saw a great deal of this country, fr...
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