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Cuisine

Cuisine - Articles


Warm weather brings fresh produce, pie

Posted On: 5/21/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Warm weather brings fresh produce, pie I’ve been in an animal sort of mood lately. Last week my invective was focused on tourists and their infrequent but blaringly stupid interactions with large wildlife, whether it be the good people in Yellowstone with the brown bear and her cubs or the tourists in our neck of the woods with the ponies on Assateague. We just don’t seem to be able to let these magnificent beasts be … we’re all animal extremists on vacation. Today, all I can think about is sharks. After all, they are so shocking a discovery in our ocean that they are making news left and right. The nation is aghast at the presence of these sea monsters, a predator that has been around as long as water itself. But enough of the sardonic attitude. I feel I need to try to help at least a few people come to terms with why sharks seem so much more prevalent today than even a year ago. Research outfits such as OCEARCH do great and important work in understanding the migration patterns, breeding patter...
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A little fermentation can go a long way

Posted On: 5/7/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

A little fermentation can go a long way The Koreans have mastered the art of fermentation, a skill that is becoming more and more prevalent as we try to understand exciting, homemade global foods such as kimchi. The first time that I ever made kimchi was about a year and a half ago, and I just finished my experimental jar today – a sad yet satisfying day in that I learned a great deal about the process. The fermentation process that occurs when you make kimchi creates probiotics and other living organisms that aid in digestion on top of adding an intense layer of flavor to a bowl of rice. In fact, many studies have shown that kimchi has more lactobacilli than yogurt, a notion that should excite a great many health nuts out there. Before I go any further, I need to tell you to do your own research on kimchi and food safety. Be careful with this, as food safety is paramount in all instances. But the fermentation process is what helps to keep this safe. Similar to brewing beer and fermenting wine, the process of makin...
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Plate so easy board member could make it

Posted On: 4/30/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Plate so easy board member could make it (Reprinted from Bayside Gazette May 1, 2014 issue) Yesterday at the club, I had the opportunity to discuss life, liberty and the pursuit of bigger and better things in Ocean Pines with one of the directors on the board. While we may not have agreed on everything (disagreement and discourse being some of the great blessings of a community within a democracy), the conversation quickly turned to the topics of the military and food. They were not subsequent topics; we were merely bouncing around. In the midst of our friendly tête-à-tête, he told me that he read my column regularly but that he didn’t, or rather couldn’t, cook what I had to offer up in my weekly ramblings. I assured him that I would find something for him to master before long. Getting home from work, it was hard to believe that it was time to cook dinner. In my mind I start reeling that maybe I need to invest in that Jetsons-style self-cooking system that I saw so often as a child. Maybe that...
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Feeling sluggish? Why not try escargot

Posted On: 4/23/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Feeling sluggish? Why not try escargot There’s just something about the French that I adore.  Maybe it’s because of my namesake; mayhap I long to understand my lineage long-removed from the old country.  The first Souplis, Andres, landed in America in 1962.  It wasn’t long before the name was Anglicized closer to the name as we know it today. French class is one of my favorites to teach, although I must say that teaching it one night a week for six weeks is next to impossible.  There are signature dishes, to be sure, but the country is so vast and the culinary traditions so deep, that it is very difficult to give even a skimming of teachings on French food.  But every year, when I teach about the southwest corner of the country, I reunite with an old friend: a la Perigourdine.  But more on that later. I’m sorry that you have to suffer through this, but every now and then I have to write about something that I know most people will not cook.  The time and the ing...
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Head back to ‘old country’ with pierogis

Posted On: 4/16/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PC III

Head back to ‘old country’ with pierogis  The horrors began early in the afternoon, just after the beautiful wedding in Queens.  I was warned of the drinking abilities of the Polish, but I felt I was ready for the task.  In fact, I knew I was ready. The day started off innocuously enough, with my five-hour drive to New York ending with a bowl of pork and barley soup, sweets on every floor of the house, a beer and some traditional Polish snacks.  I wasn’t worried a bit. But it wasn’t until I was at a small table in the bride’s house with the older men, uncles and aunts that I realized that I would have to pace myself.  It was only four o’clock in the afternoon, for god’s sake. My dear friend married a beautiful Polish woman and her family flew in from the Old Country to celebrate.  As I was somehow in the house alone with the family and one other Anglophone, a Frenchman who was a friend of the groom as well, we quickly learned that we were grateful for the limousin...
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Fresh guacamole nourishes body, spirit

Posted On: 4/9/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Fresh guacamole nourishes body, spirit Today it is chilly and raining. Yesterday I was in shorts and T-shirt, walking barefoot to the mailbox with my barefoot children. Yes, we are the hillbillies of Ocean Pines as we see shoes are the devil and as soon as we can whisk them off of our feet, we do. I’m just so glad that my children are following suit, “Delmarva Chicken Fungus” be damned. And with the summer air, for that is what I’m calling it after the late winter that we just had, comes the miraculous foods from South of the Border, reminiscent of the time that I spent out in California. It was nothing to hop in a car back in the day and drive down to Rosarito or Ensenada and spent a little money on a lot of food. Of course, we would have to pay off the federales on occasion, but you get used to that. I’ve written about the street carts before, noting on the bacon-wrapped hot dogs with Italian-style relish in Tijuana. I’ve commented on the five-course lobster dinner in a seaside tow...
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Give your arteries a break, eat a salad

Posted On: 3/26/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Give your arteries a break, eat a salad In the last three weeks, we have made fresh sausages, 100 percent beef hot dogs wrapped in caul fat, pates, terrines, and liverwurst mousse.  But why stop there?  Of course, we have to look at the desserts that we served to 270 people last weekend as part of our annual Dessert Theater:  lemon meringue cupcakes, chocolate-hazelnut mousse on crisps and sticky toffee pudding cake. The meringue was an amazing cooked meringue that rivaled fresh gooey marshmallows when toasted with the torch.  The lemon curd still lingers on my taste buds, as the effervescence of the lemon peel permeates my memory. The sticky toffee cake was everything you would expect: an amazingly rich and dense pudding that might as well have been comprised of pure sugar.  After all, it pretty much was pure sugar, and I am a big fan. But all things must come to an end, and after a couple weeks of food-linked frivolities, I know that I must once again regain control over the only temple with w...
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In lieu of a wok, cook stir fry in batches

Posted On: 3/12/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

 The OCHMRA Show has come to an end, the brokers have moved on to the next town and I sit here recovering from more time standing on concrete. Apparently, I must love the abuse that concrete affords my aging soles, since I spent the previous weekend in D.C. working the AIPAC convention.  At least this weekend I wasn’t clocking 15 miles per day in my clogs.  Note to self:  Next time bring a couple different pairs of shoes.  What was I thinking? It took three days for my feet to recover from my D.C. trip, and when I got home, I decided to put on a pair of comfortable boots, but my feet wouldn’t even fit in the footwear that once regularly housed my barking dogs. This weekend, though, was no problem.  I sat down a great deal and was able to talk to students, peruse the products on the show floor and see old friends in the business that I don’t get to see anymore.  On these weekends I realize that I need to get out more. Upon driv...
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Sweet salad will ‘make your mind melt’

Posted On: 3/5/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

So we have another snow day.  I am happy, since our winter prospects were looking bleak until two weeks ago.  I was completely ready for spring to spring, but now I sit here with the snow on the ground, pets and kids snuggled in the couch as we watch the tele, happy that we were awarded another respite in our school week. This is especially satisfying, because by the time that you read this, it will be March and the sun will be warmer and higher in the sky, so we’ll take a nice snowstorm on this particular day as a gift. But for now, suffice to say that I needed this snow day.  Yesterday was a long, 15- hour day and now I’m getting ready to head to D.C. to get some work done up there, and that will be a brutal weekend with 16-hour days.  A day off is just what the doctor ordered.  Looking at all of the food that we cooked this week, I settled on writing about this healthy, gorgeous salad that has no many nuances and flavors that it will make you...
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Slow things down with blackened salmon

Posted On: 2/26/15
Written By: Paul Suplee, CEC PCIII

Sometimes I feel like I just need to slow down a bit.  With all the extracurricular activities with the kids, work, writing, snapping pictures and trying to keep the house straight, I don’t get much sleep. Now that the season is creeping up on us, I’m also looking for summer employment or maybe even considering a summer business venture of my own.  My mind is like a constantly spinning hamster wheel:  sometimes there’s an idea running rampant on it while, more often than not, the wheel spins empty It’s a vacuum in which not much intellectual stimulation is happening.  But, I’ve come to accept that. When life gets in the way, we tend to migrate to prepackaged foods, fast food garbage or any of the myriad convenience products that we could get our mitts on.  But, the kids were the ones who say, “Enough, Dad.  We need some fresh food.” That’s all that I needed to hear, so I set out on a simple journey of a ...
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